Cutting the Apple Cord

My smartphone history has been limited to the iPhone 3G and iPhone 4. The 3G was a revelation, with almost magical apps like Shazam and Runkeeper. The 4 was a beautiful piece of hardware, featuring brushed metal and glass instead of plastic.

After a time, though, my phone grew less and less responsive, with longer latency and complete lack of ability to even open Whatsapp (though my incredibly prolific relatives also bear some responsibility here). The glass cracked multiple times, the updates failed to support my outdated version of the phone, and I became dissatisfied with Apples grip on my devices.

I don’t believe I’ve ever subscribed to the Apple lifestyle, and my disgust grew during recent visits to the Apple store, a transparent cube-cum-rowhouse in DC’s tony Georgetown neighborhood. Now that Google is devoting resources to visual design to go along with their best-in-class engineering, I decided the time is right to go with a device running Android. I chose the Samsung Galaxy S5, a “free” upgrade, and have been using it for a couple of days.

It’s been my first immersive experience with Google’s material design, and it is impressive. The learning curve for the new operating system is surprisingly steep, with unfamiliar gestures, navigation, and design patterns sending me on to Google for instructions in relatively simple tasks. But the uniformity in everything from color to symbols to type helps.

My biggest issues are with the hardware. I like the easy access to the battery and SIM card in the Galaxy S5, but the plastic feels flimsy and the rounded edges allow it to slip out of my pocket. I prefer the heft and blockiness of the iPhone 4, as well as the much smaller screen, which affords one-handed use much more easily.

On the whole, I’m happy with the change. I’ll be even happier if this phone becomes an afterthought, something that I use rarely to accomplish discrete tasks before putting it away and turning my attention to the world off-screen.